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dc.contributor.authorDriver, Charles Malcolm
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-12T02:28:29Z
dc.date.available2018-11-12T02:28:29Z
dc.date.issued1936
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/14050
dc.description.abstractLuceme as a crop has been known for thousands of years. As far back as the history of man goes it was used in Central Asia, being the oldest plant oultivated for forage alone. It was prized by the Medians, Grecians and Romans, the Romans carrying seed with them to establish at their military bases. Where known in England in tbe 15th century, it was highly prized but was not widely known till the 17th century. It was introduced to Germany in the 16th century and America in the 19th century. Much improvement has taken place through the centuries with the result that a good variety, suited to the locality and well managed, will give a heavy yield of green herbage, when compared with the yield from pasture. This herbage is produced in the main during summer periods when it is used tor the supplementary feeding of cattle and sheep, and for the production of hay and silage.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectAlfalfa Varietiesen_US
dc.subjectAlfalfaen_US
dc.subjectAlfalfa Geneticsen_US
dc.titleAn investigation into some problems connected with inbreeding in lucerne (Medicago sativa) : being the results from work for a thesis for honours in Field Husbandry (M. Agr. Sc.)en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineField Husbandryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Agricultural Science (M. Agr. Sc.)en_US


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